Liverpool History Society Questions

A selection of Liverpool history questions submitted to the Liverpool History Society

Jug with "Liverpool Fly"


Hi,
I have acquired a pottery jug, 6 ½” tall, painted with a coaching scene on the side panels of which is written “Liverpool Fly.  The jug is circa 1795 (as sold to me), but could be anything up to circa 1820. In perfect condition tho’ with a little touching up to the coach.

I have done some research in a few Gages directories of that era but to no avail – there are many named Liverpool coaches but no “Liverpool Fly” that I can trace.

Photos attached – Any ideas?

Best Wishes,
Paul & Gill Breen,
E-Mail : paul_gill@blueyonder.co.uk

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12/01/2011 - Posted by | Jug with "Liverpool Fly" | , ,

2 Comments »

  1. Hello Paul and Gill,

    I originally assumed the jug is either from the Herculaneum Pottery was based in Toxteth, between 1793/4 and 1841 or one of the other Liverpool potteries They mostly made cream ware and pearlware pottery as well as bone china porcelain. About 1793-4 Richard Abbey, who had been apprenticed to John Sadler, an engraver, started, in conjunction with a Scotchman named John Graham, a pottery at Toxteth Park, on the south side of the River Mersey. The jug is highly coloured and not something I have seen previously examples as most decorated jugs are usually in one colour although coloured pieces were made.

    Is the jug marked? As Thomas Case and James Mort introduced as a trademark the Liver, which is the crest of the borough of Liverpool. In 1836 they were succeeded by Mort & Simpson, who continued until the close of the works in 1841. Early wares were marked “HERCULANEUM”

    Regards

    Rob Ainsworth
    Liverpool History Society

    Comment by Liverpool History | 12/01/2011 | Reply

  2. Hi,

    Could it have been connected to the canal boats which took people from Liverpool to Scarisbrick, from where they took the coach to Southport ?

    This is only a guess; I don’t know what these coaches were called.

    Netta Dixon.

    Comment by Anonymous | 12/01/2011 | Reply


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