Liverpool History Society Questions

A selection of Liverpool history questions submitted to the Liverpool History Society

The Liver Sketching Club


Liver Sketching Club

Cuthbert's Building in 14 Clayton Square

I am writing the history of The Liver Sketching Club which has been active in Liverpool since 1872.

If anyone has information about the club or its members, I would be very interested – but my question is:
The club moved into the city centre from Everton in the late 1870s and occupied premises on the top floor of a fruit warehouse in Williamson Street, Liverpoool until it moved to Clayton Square in 1880.  
 
Does anyone know of the existence of a fruit merchant’s business in Williamson Street around 1879 to enable me to identify the address?
I would be pleased to acknowledge anyone who provides information in the final draft.
My email address is davidartshe(AT)yahoo.co.uk
Many thanks.
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20/07/2011 - Posted by | Uncategorized |

4 Comments »

  1. Dear David,

    there were a number of warehouses in Williamson Street (please see the listing from Kelly’s Directory for 1885). Numbers 18 to 26 looks suitable as it is listed as a wholesale provision dealer.

    Regards

    Rob Ainsworth

    Web Administrator
    Liverpool History Society

    Comment by Liverpool History Society Questions | 20/07/2011 | Reply

  2. Rob,

    Without wishing to impose on your kindness, do you have any idea which building was called Cuthbert’s Building in Clayton Square around 1890?

    Thanks.

    David Brown

    Comment by Liverpool History Society Questions | 20/07/2011 | Reply

  3. David,

    Cuthbert’s Building was in 14 Clayton Square.

    Regards

    Rob Ainsworth

    Web Administrator
    Liverpool History Society

    Comment by Liverpool History Society Questions | 20/07/2011 | Reply

  4. Rob,

    An update on the Liver Sketching Club and the Williamson Street premises:

    After going through many more old documents, I have found a reference to the club being at 22 Williamson Street around 1879. So you were correct in thinking it was probably numbers 18 to 26.

    Thanks again.

    David

    David Brown

    Comment by David Brown | 23/07/2011 | Reply


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